Time for a little word association. When we say “respectful for Indigenous Australian culture,” the first thing that pops to mind is “high-end designer fashion label,” clearly.

Chanel, of all bloody companies, recently launched its Spring-Summer Pre-Collection for 2017, which is a hell of a title. In amongst the myriad of standard fashion regalia, Chanel has put out a baffling line of “other accessories,” all of which are a) gaudy, b) exorbitantly expensive, and c) mystifying in concept. Why anyone in their right mind would drop AUD$570 on a set of four Chanel tennis balls in a leather pouch is beyond me.

But in amongst the line – which includes things like a tennis racquet, a surf/paddle board, and a set of beach racquets – is this.

A Chanel-branded boomerang. Because nothing say “capitalism is good, actually” quite like blatant cultural appropriation of an indigenous people halfway around the world.

The boomerang, which retails at a hefty $1,930 if you don’t freakin’ mind, is made from “wood & resin” and is an extremely real thing that you can actually buy, as makeup/YouTube person Jeffree Star plainly exhibited in his Snapchat feed overnight.

This isn’t the first time Chanel’s produced a boomerang as part of their lines, either. It would appear that they’ve been selling a boomerang in one form or another for a solid few years now. In this day of social media and consumer-lead accountability, it feels like a big oversight that this one’s constantly gone through to the keeper.

The discovery of the boomerang has lead to some (quite rightfully) wrinkled brows on the online.

It doesn’t really matter which way you look at this. It is ah… not good.

Not good at all.

Source: Chanel.com.

Photos: Chanel.com.