In an absolute win-win, IKEA is offering to buy back your old furniture at double the normal rate in return for a voucher.

To celebrate Black Friday sales next week, the furniture gods are encouraging customers to give its Buy Back service a red-hot go.

If you’re not too familiar with the service, it’s pretty much IKEA’s way of encouraging people to upcycle furniture instead of sending it to landfill. The team will calculate a buy-back value for you online, then all you have to do is bring your furniture and your estimate to your fave IKEA store.

An IKEA team member will then suss out the furniture to make sure it’s not, well, broken. If you get the A-okay, then the team member will give you your estimate value in the form of an IKEA refund voucher.

Then your furniture will be resold via IKEA’s As-Is section, but more on that later.

IKEA Family members have from November 24 until December 31 to receive double the value back compared to normal rates.

Non-IKEA Family customers will just get the normal amount of buy-back value as per usual.

But that’s not all, because IKEA’s doing things a little differently this time around. Instead of just re-selling the furniture with its original Nordic name, IKEA will rename the product with the name of its previous owner. So the Steff (hi, hello) table could become the Harry table, and so on and so forth.

It’s all about giving IKEA furniture a second, third, or fourth life.

“Adding the name of the previous owner gives the next owner a glimpse into its previous life, as it makes its way into the home of its new owner,” Ryan Burman, Commercial Activity Leader said.

You can suss out IKEA’s Buy Back service right here.

Anywho, the As-Is section is where you can find a slew of floor samples, discontinued pieces, and pre-loved goodies at a reduced price. Think beds, desks, sofas, seasonal items – the whole kit and caboodle. It’s the stuff of DIY dreams.

According to IKEA Australia, 720,000 products were sold through its As-Is area in the last financial year. That’s an average of about 13,800 goodies a week across 10 stores. Not bad, not bad at all.

Image: Netflix / Tidying Up With Marie Kondo