Timothée Chalamet, otherwise known as your new Hollywood bae, has hit it out of the park with two critically-acclaimed roles in recent months, scoring an Oscar nomination for the arty romantic drama Call Me By Your Name and following it up with the much-loved Ladybird.

Like many rising and established stars, Chalamet has heard the call of Netflix, and his next project will be a film for the streaming service, based on the life of 14th-century English monarch Henry V. The film is called The King, and per the official plot description:

After his brother is killed in battle before his coronation, a young king is [crowned] in the late 1300s. The reluctant ruler wears the crown at a time when England was near a war with France, and the empire is teetering. 

Robert Pattinson is also set to star in the film, which is based on a script co-written by Aussie actor Joel Edgerton and producer David Michôd. At this stage, The King is set to be released at some point in 2019.

Timothée Chalamet recently completed work on the Woody Allen flick A Rainy Day In New York, although a question mark currently hangs over that film’s release, with one source claiming that it may arrive without a marketing campaign, or be dumped entirely.

In a recent Instagram post, Chalamet announced that he would be donating the entirety of his Rainy Day salary to charitable causes, saying:

This year has changed the way I see and feel about so many things; it has been a thrilling and, at times, enlightening education. I have, to this point, chosen projects from the perspective of a young actor trying to walk in the footsteps of more seasoned actors I admire. But I am learning that a good role isn’t the only criteria for accepting a job – that has become much clearer to me in the past few months, having witnessed the birth of a powerful movement intent on ending injustice, inequality and above all, silence.

I have been asked in a few recent interviews about my decision to work on a film with Woody Allen last summer. I’m not able to answer the question directly because of contractual obligations. But what I can say is this: I don’t want to profit from my work on the film, and to that end, I am going to donate my entire salary to three charities: TIME’S UP, The LGBT Center in New York, and RAINN. I want to be worthy of standing shoulder to shoulder with the brave artists who are fighting for all people to be treated with the respect and dignity they deserve.

 

Source: Deadline
Image: Getty Images / Dan MacMedan