People in hazmat suits will be delivering trophies to winners at their homes on Sunday night, for the Emmys this year.

The 72nd Emmy Awards will be virtual this year due to the corona virus pandemic, and it has left some questions about how the night will actually run.

The award show which is due to broadcast at 8pm on September 20 (10am September 21, AEST) will have to make long distance participation work. There will be 130 units that includes high-end camera, lighting and boom mics being sent to nominees around the globe.

As for the red carpet entertainment, there will still be red carpet show programming, but what that will actually look like I don’t know. It could be like the VMAs which had physical red carpets that  stars posed at prior to the actual event.

The host of the night will be Jimmy Kimmel who has encouraged the nominees to “come as they are.” Which hopefully means we’ll get to see a lot of A-list celebrities dressed in PJs or trackies.

In a letter to the nominees in July, the Emmy award organisers confirmed that the award show would be digital.

“This year, it’s still going to be TV industry’s biggest night out… but we’ll come to you! We are assembling a top notch team of technicians, producers and writers to work closely with Jimmy Kimmel and with you and your team, to make sure that we can film with you (and loved ones or whomever else you choose to be with) at your home, or another location of your choice.”

So how exactly the night work with the people in hazmat suits? Brian Cox told BBC earlier this week that there will be someone standing outside with an Emmy for all the nominees, ready to give it to the winner.

“There’s going to be a man standing outside the door with an Emmy, which I may not win!” said Cox, who is nominated for best drama actor.

“Every Emmy nominee – there’ll be a man standing outside their house,” he said.

I feel like that’s going to be terrifying for the neighbours, who will just see a person in a hazmat suit waiting outside their neighbours front door. But I guess that’s the world we live in now.