In the wake of the college admissions scandal that exposed 50 affluent parents including celebrities Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin, the famous folk involved responded by revoking access to their social media accounts but as of yet, no one has spoken about the crimes committed… until now.

Jack Buckingham, the son of marketing CEO and parenting book author Jane Buckingham who was charged in the college admissions bribery scandal, just released a statement to The Hollywood Reporter apologising for the scam and claiming that he had no knowledge of what his mother was doing to ensure his admission.

“I have been advised not to speak on the matter at hand but what I will say is this,” he said, before continuing.

“I know there are millions of kids out there both wealthy and less fortunate who grind their ass off just to have a shot at the college of their dreams. I am upset that I was unknowingly involved in a large scheme that helps give kids who may not work as hard as others an advantage over those who truly deserve those spots.”

“For that, I am sorry, although I know my word does not mean much to many people at the moment,” Jack continued. “While the situation I am going through is not a pleasant one, I take comfort in the fact that this might help finally cut down on money and wealth being such a heavy factor in college admissions. Instead, I hope colleges may prioritize [looking at] an applicant’s character, intellect, and other qualities over everything else.”

“It was probably not a smart idea to say anything but I needed to get that off my chest,” he concluded.

Meanwhile, Jane’s daughter Lilia Buckingham tweeted this earlier this week:

According to the criminal complaint documents, the mother of two allegedly conspired with indicted plot organiser William Singer to have a professional test taker from Florida take the ACT for her son in July 2018. In exchange for his services, Jane agreed to make a $50,000 “charitable donation,” the document states.

“I know this is craziness, I know it is,” she wrote to Singer, in a conversation outlined in court papers. “I need you to get him into USC, and then I need you to cure cancer and [make peace] in the Middle East.”

Yowzers.