Content-sharing, procrastination blackhole Reddit is many things. A repository for the greatest cat GIF collection known to man. A thrumming hive of activity dealing in ‘Serial‘ conspiracy theories. A place for users to get answers to things they want to know, but are too afraid to ask. Citizen journalism. Celebrities being asked anything. A buttload of earth porn. And real porn, if you’re asking for a friend. On reddit, everything is beautiful and [almost] nothing hurts.

Following Reddit’s recent sojourn into podcasts—Reddit now produces a weekly podcast, “Upvoted“—the front page of the internet has now taken strides in becoming a fully-fledged media company (Wired called it), with their launch of an original video content platform announced today.

The video division will be led by two former employees of tech and culture blog ‘The Verge’, with its first promo highlighting the unique nature of “community” seen on Reddit, and the kind of one-off stories the platform tends to produce on a daily basis. Like its podcast—where “stories that hit our frontpages and left a lasting impression” are explored in-depth—Reddit’s aims for video content seems to be taking a similar approach, if their ~feel good~ [Humans of New York meets subreddit culture] introduction is anything to go by.

Unf. Smells like iPhone commercial.

The platform will initially take on AMA’s, translating walls of Q&A text into shareable visual content. A concept which Reddit isn’t entirely new to – Explain Like I’m Five was adapted into a video series not too long ago. 

First stop video originals, next stop the world. Proud of u, Reddit. 

via The Verge.