A new study has declared that Tasmania is one of the few places in the world that would be able to survive a full global collapse, should the ongoing march of clime change make the shit extremely hit the fan.

The research paper, published by Sustainability on July 21st, identified the southern island state as one of five ‘collapse lifeboat’ states that people would likely look to move to in the event of a major relocation, alongside the UK, Iceland, Ireland and the southern island of New Zealand.

In fact, the research determined that New Zealand would be the best place to form a ‘node of persisting complexity’ (read: a society similar to what we have now), with Tassie, Iceland and Ireland also having “favourable characteristics”.

The study believes that the large population revolutions and the “energy-intensive industrial civilisation” of the modern world has created a period called the “Great Acceleration”. Caused by marked increases and exponential growth in things like population, energy and freshwater usage, and cement production, this period poses a threat to the Earth’s limits being exceeded, everything being “moved out of equilibrium”, and a global collapse event more likely.

Researchers also noted that their studies and sources “paint a picture of human civilisation that is in a perilous state”, which definitely doesn’t make me feel wildly anxious.

To figure out what places around the world would be suitable to survive a global collapse, the researchers ranked countries depending on a range of elements.

An ability to grow food to sustain a population, the proximity and connection to larger populations and ability to manage borders in instances of mass-migration, and existing indigenous renewable energy resources, manufacturing capacities, and a general proneness to climate change were all used as markers to rank countries, which makes sense that Tassie landed in that top five – and New Zealand’s south island topped the list.

Now if you’ll excuse me, I’m gonna go ahead and move to Hobart.

Image: Getty Images / Paparwin Tanupatarachai