Billie Eilish has shared candidly about her own mental health experiences, how people shouldn’t feel ashamed to ask for help or go see a therapist, and the importance of actively listening to friends, in a video for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.

With a debut album that speaks into the teenage experience for a generation that is the latest wave of early adopters and has generally been immersed in social media and its pressures since birth, Billie Eilish’s perspective on mental health as a 17-year-old is all about open communication, listening to and looking out for you mates, and banishing the stigma of shame.

View this post on Instagram

never cried more in my life

A post shared by BILLIE EILISH (@billieeilish) on

Though she admits she’s still trying to learn more about her own mental health and how she “can stay okay“, Billie believes that asking for help or checking in with a therapist isn’t a sign of weakness.

It doesn’t make you weak to ask for help. It doesn’t. It doesn’t make you weak to ask for a friend, to go to a therapist. It shouldn’t make you feel weak to go to anyone for help. You should be able to ask anyone for help. And everyone has to help someone if they need it.

She goes on to talk about how important it is to just be there for your friends because you never know what they might be quietly struggling with. Talking about her own journey with Bad Brain Days, Billie says that reaching out even with a simple text to tell someone you’re thinking of them can make all the difference.

I’m not a trained professional and I have no idea what I’m doing half the time but I’ve seen it, and I’ve been it. And even if it’s just a little bit more comfort, that can really mean a lot to someone, because you don’t know what is going on. Even in that moment, there might be something going on.

It’s been like that for me. There have been certain people that have texted me right when I needed to be texted, saying that they loved me and they were thinking about me, and it really means a lot.

The video is a part of a bigger campaign called Seize The Awkward, encouraging people to have conversations about mental health with friends, actively listening to each other, in efforts to break down the weird stigma about talking about our feelings with our mates.

Check out the full video below, it’s further proof that the Yeet Generation is going to save us all.

If you or one of your mates is struggling with mental health, know that you’re not alone. Get in touch with Lifeline on 13 11 14 or Beyond Blue on 1300 22 4636. Or reach out to a mate you’re concerned about with some of these conversation starters from Beyond Blue.

Image: Getty Images / Jo Hale