Yesterday, news broke that Chicago teen Kenneka Jenkins was found dead in a hotel freezer after partying with friends the night before.

The 19-year-old’s body was discovered after her friends informed her mother, Tereasa Martin, that they couldn’t find her around 4am, and her mum raised the alarm. By the time her body was discovered, she had been missing for 24 hours.

There’s a hell of a lot of mystery surrounding her death, and since news broke, people have become internet sleuths trying to figure out what happened.

Police have not yet said who discovered Jenkins, if there were signs of trauma, if they suspected foul play, or if the freezer had a latch that would have allowed her to escape.

Her mother claims that Jenkins’ friends have changed their stories, and told WGN, a Chicago news station, “I believe someone in this hotel killed my child.”

A lot of the mystery surrounds a Facebook Live video apparently streamed by one of Jenkins friends, in which internet sleuths claim you can hear Jenkins say, “help me.”

In another part of the video, you can hear someone say, “we’re about to murder somebody.”

Detectives have confirmed to media that they are aware of the video and have identified most of the people in the video.

Rosemont Police spokesperson Gary Mack told the Chicago Tribune:

“Yes, they’ve looked at it and continue to look at it and all the other social media videos and posts. They are leaving no stone unturned as far as trying to corral everyone they can and talk to them and interview them about what happened and what was going on that night.”

He also addressed the social media attention (the video has been shared more than 46,000 times, and Twitter users sent #KennekaJenkins trending), saying that it doesn’t hurt the investigation.

“In law enforcement this kind of social media has become king, so everybody with a camera is a reporter now, and [investigators are] just taking it in stride as best they can.”

He said it might take months to find out what happened. An autopsy has been ordered, but toxicology reports routinely take weeks or months to complete.

“I don’t think anything has been ruled in or ruled out at this point. It’s just considered a death investigation at this point.”

 

Source: Chicago Tribune
Image: Getty Images / [Photographer name]