The tech lords over at Telstra have successfully tested some wild new tech that will make the roads safer for drivers, cyclists and pedestrians. 

Partnering with Cohda Wireless, the trial demonstrated the abilities of Vehicle-to-Pedestrian (V2P) technology, which uses Telstra’s 4G network to provide early-warning collision detection via a mobile app. 
That means a pedestrian or cyclist in danger of being hit by a car will receive a warning via their phone that could absolutely save their lives. Nice one. 
The tests were carried out in South Australia using common scenarios that could result in a gnarly injury – a car and cyclist approaching a blind corner, a car reversing out of a driveway, and a car approaching a pedestrian crossing. 
Håkan Eriksson, Telstra’s chief technology officer says this technology will not only make our roads safer, it’ll make them more efficient. 
“The most important outcome of V2X technology is the increased safety for road users, as the impact of human error can be minimised by helping vehicles communicate with each other and react to their surroundings,” he said.
This type of communication will also help pave the way for driverless cars, which, in case you’ve forgotten, are still on the bloody way. 

“This is the first time V2P technology has been trialled in Australia on a 4G network, and is an important step on the journey to fully-autonomous vehicles on Australian roads,” said Mr Eriksson.

And the South Australian Government are frothing for driverless tech, granting Telstra the first lot of their $10 million Future Mobility Lab Fund to help with local testing, as well as research and development of autonomous technologies. 

“With this industry expected to be worth $90 billion worldwide by 2030, it’s vital that we encourage and support businesses locally to get involved on the ground floor,” said South Australian Transport and Infrastructure MinisterStephen Mullighan.
While driverless technology is exciting as hell, it’s also nice to know that the safety of drivers, cyclists and pedestrians is a top priority moving into the future.
Photo: Quicksilver.