Alt fashion store Dangerfield is copping major flack for discontinuing its plus-size fashion range, Dangerfield Curve. It’s a particularly disappointing move given the absolute dearth of accessible, stylish plus-sized fashion available in Australia.

The Curve line ran from an Aussie size 18-24 and according to the brand’s website now only has two available products, a harness belt and a mesh top. Discontinuing the line will alienate a number of plus size customers, because the rest of Dangerfield’s clothing only goes up to a size 20.

Predictably, the decision’s gained traction across social media, with customers sharing their frustration at both the discontinuation of Curve and the fact that Dangerfield still hasn’t released a public statement explaining why it’s now gone.

One TikTok user shared a haul of items she got in the Curve line’s clearance sale with a caption reading “it was fun to be able to shop for cute things while it lasted”.

The video also included the text caption: “back to never shopping for clothes again”.

That sentiment is particularly telling, IMO. Plus-sized people deserve to be able to express themselves through their clothing but so few brands make that possible, especially in the Australian clothing market where it’s virtually impossible to find something to wear above a size 14.

Dangerfield’s decision reduces an already incredibly limited pool of clothing options. According to one user in the comments, the range was only introduced in February, meaning it didn’t even last a year before it was pulled.

Another said “I cried when I found this out. It used to be such a comforting and exciting place for us and now it’s just another place we’re excluded from”.

The  OG user made another video sharing what she knew about the discontinuation. Roughly a fortnight ago, she visited her local store where a sales associate confirmed that the company was caning the range.

“The decision had been made to discontinue the plus sized clothes, and all of the clothes they did have in the plus sized range were shipped back to the warehouse to be sold from the warehouse at ridiculously discounted prices,” the sales associate said according to the TikToker.

@round_nerdReply to @round_nerd ##plussizefashion ##plussizehaul they said all we can do is email support to show we want bigger clothes ????♬ original sound – Round Nerd Cosplay

There’s now also no ‘Curve’ tab on the website.  When you Google ‘Dangerfield Curve’, a link to the brand’s plus-size range comes up, but only features the previously mentioned belt and mesh top.

The remaining Curve range clothing on Dangerfield’s site.

As pointed out by the user – and other customers online – Dangerfield has so far been silent about the decision.

PEDESTRIAN.TV has reached out to Dangerfield, but didn’t receive a response by the time of publishing.

In the brand’s most recent Insta post, which was shared a day ago, the comments were flooded by people asking for answers.

One comment read: “Still waiting on answers about the plus size range ????????‍”.

Another said, “really shocked and disappointed about the removal of the plus-size/curve range, if you are going to stock them as part of the all range thats great but I have a feeling this isn’t the case after checking the size charts on your websites”.

One Insta commentator asked whether the brand would honour requests for refunds from people who’d bought Dangerfield giftcards as Christmas presents, which would now be unusable with the Curve range gone.

On Twitter, the response was the same.

Ultimately, this isn’t just about Dangerfield, though: it’s about the way the Australian fashion market almost universally isolates anyone bigger than a size 14.

Fashion and clothing are essential parts of how we express ourselves. In this way, Dangerfield’s decision will remove the opportunity for so many people to wear clothes that reflect both their sense of style and their identity.

Image: Instagram / @dangerfieldclothing