A Twitter thread has emerged online that is unpacking all of the scams and myths that we’ve been lead to believe here in Australia, and my God there really is a lot of things that truly aren’t amazing about Down Under.

The thread was started by writer Elias Jahshan, who asked Twitter: “What’s something that’s clearly a scam but Australian people have been conditioned to believe it’s ‘normal’?”

Already there have been tonnes of responses, with people listing off the things that they feel they have been conditioned to support in Australia. Honestly, some of these answers had me thinking twice about what goes on here.

First off, the big doozy, Australia Day. Probably one of the biggest scams that a lot of us have been supporting for decades, despite the very clear problems that surround it.

Given the years of discussion around changing the date of this day, it’s safe to say that we should no longer be celebrating something as shameful as colonialism.

For years we’ve run this myth that we’re ‘the lucky country’, despite the whole phrase coming from a book that called Australia that sarcastically. Yikes.

Speaks for itself really. Let’s stop supporting this for good <3.

Truly Australia is not the only country guilty of this, but alas, we definitely still have a problem around vilifying and othering people.

Ahh yes, the Melbourne Cup. Let’s all give that a big ‘ol no thanks.

Just merge those Liquorland and BWS stores with the supermarkets already.

The governor-general… love that person. I can definitely name them right now for you, and recall the last time I saw them do something. Great person.

As someone who grew up on English muffins, which usually came with British flags and art on them, this information has shaken me.

The good old scam idea of a fair go. In three letters this Twitter user captured the biggest scam of them all.

Now, someone needs to do something about this one, because it is a PROBLEM.

It’s hard to really pinpoint what on Earth Aussie culture is, and why it’s current definitions are almost explicitly exclusionary.

Image: Getty Images / Richard Sharrocks