Just as The Spice Girls* united a disparate youth through the galvanising effects of Girl Power, and in doing so managed to mobilise an entire generation of young women both musically and stylistically, so will the three women from Pussy Riot, who were today sentenced to two years in prison.

The result has already been greatly felt in the spheres of international politics, music and style; and although the latter might seem to be a bit of a stretch, the trademark bright colours and ski masks – which are a big part of both the band’s creative performance and projection of anonymity – of Pussy Riot have becoming something of a recognisable style symbol representing not just their outspoken stance, but their feminist ass-kicking of bigoted politicians.

Overnight, the three young women (two of which are mothers) – Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, 23, Yekaterina Samutsevich, 30, and Maria Alyokhina, 24 – were convicted of hooliganism in Moscow. Hooliganism is a charge that, in this case, carries with it a two year imprisonment sentence in a penal colony for the supposed danger that the band posed to society in committing a “grave crime [that is an] insult and a humiliation of the Christian faith and [incites] religious hatred” – at least, that’s according to Judge Marina Syrova, who handed down their sentence.

The disproportionate charges levelled against these women for staging a balaclava-clad Putin protest back in February in the capital’s main Orthodox cathedral have prompted an enormous outcry from both artists, the general (Internet) population, as well as European and Western governments alike. Earlier this month Madonna spoke out publicly against Putin’s government and has since been labelled a ‘whore‘ by its deputy Prime Minister. She’s also being sued by conservative Russian activists for $10.5 million after speaking out against discrimination at her St. Petersburg concert. Those Russians, hey?

Sir Paul McCartney, Sting, Björk Kathleen Hanna, Peaches, Peter, Björn & John, the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, the Hives and Lykke Li are just a few of the other artists who have spoken out against the Pussy Riot verdict, and in the last twenty-four hours thousands of people have gathered en masse in public opposition.

Here are some of The Best Street Photos From The Global Pussy Riot Protests; because while Putin might think it’s justified to take away the human right to freedom of speech, he’ll never be able to take away our freedom to discuss international politics through the sphere of street photography.

*I jest! The Spice Girls and Pussy Riot are in no way comparable.

PR Supporters wear vivid colour-blocking outfits consisting of ski masks and tape over their mouths as they protest in front of the Russian embassy in Warsaw. The block colours recall those worn by the band in their Punk Prayer protest video (see above). Photos by Wojtek Radwanski for AFP.

Photos From The Front Line Of The Pussy Riot Protests

Photos From The Front Line Of The Pussy Riot Protests

A rally held in Times Square drew this protester, who takes umbrage in burnt orange. Simba also got in on the act, as did these two young women with great signs. Photos by Mario Tama for Getty Images News.

Photos From The Front Line Of The Pussy Riot Protests

Photos From The Front Line Of The Pussy Riot Protests

Nice use of fisheye by Don Emert for Getty Images News.

Photos From The Front Line Of The Pussy Riot Protests

Russian policemen detain a young supporter near the court building in Moscow. Photo by Andrey Smirnov for AFP.

Photos From The Front Line Of The Pussy Riot Protests

Yekaterina Samutsevich (C), Maria Alyokhina (L) and Nadezhda Tolokonnikova (R) show the court’s verdict after delivering judgment as they sit in a glass box in court. Photo by AFP.

Photos From The Front Line Of The Pussy Riot Protests

“Fuck this shit” near the Sagrada Familia in Barcelona. Photo by Josep Lago for AFP.

Photos From The Front Line Of The Pussy Riot Protests

Yellow, like red, is a colour popular with calls to action. This is from the Russian embassy in Kiev. Photo by Genya Savilov.

Photos From The Front Line Of The Pussy Riot Protests

An activist from the Ukrainian feminist group Femen raises a chainsaw after cutting down a crucifix erected in the memory of victims of the political repression in Kiev. Photo by Genya Savilov for AFP.

Photos From The Front Line Of The Pussy Riot Protests

The cast of HBO’s Girls voice the opinion of a generation (in London). Photo by Carl Court for AFP.

Photos From The Front Line Of The Pussy Riot Protests

Perhaps the best turned out in street style stakes. Classic London. Photo by Dan Kitwood for Getty Images News.

Photos From The Front Line Of The Pussy Riot Protests

Vagina dentata bites the head off Vladimir Putin in Berlin. Photo by Sean Gallop for Getty Images News.

Photos From The Front Line Of The Pussy Riot Protests

A clear mask and cat-eye shades raise the style stakes in Berlin. Not sure about the caption (Rights? Riots?). Photo by Sean Gallup for Getty Images News.

Photos From The Front Line Of The Pussy Riot Protests