Dylan Farrow has launched attacks on actresses Cate Blanchett and Blake Lively for taking a public stand against sexual harassment and the mistreatment of women while remaining silent on their involvement with her own father, Woody Allen.

Yesterday, the New York Times published a piece on Blanchett, who will headline the jury at this year’s Cannes Film Festival, calling her a “vocal campaigner against harassment” and her appointment on the panel “an about-face for a festival with a poor record on gender equality.”

Farrow, who has long-alleged that her father molested her on multiple occasions as a child, took to Twitter, where she replied:

“Can one be a “vocal campaigner against sexual harassment” and a vocal supporter of Woody Allen? Seems a tad oxymoronic.”

This is not the first time Dylan Farrow has addressed Cate Blanchett – when the Australian actress was campaigning for an Academy Award for her performance in Blue Jasmine, Allen’s daughter wrote her a letter saying “what it if had been your child?”

At the time, Blanchett responded:

“It’s obviously been a long and painful situation for the family, and I hope they find some resolution and peace.”

Overnight, Farrow also Tweeted at Blake Lively, who is one of the organisers of Time’s Up!, an initiative that aims to set up a defense fund for women of all industries who find themselves victims of sexual harassment.

Time’s Up!, which recently unveiled a commemorative pin with its logo, and is supported by the likes of Reese Witherspoon and Shonda Rimes, is also one of the forces behind the movement to wear black to upcoming awards ceremonies like the Golden Globes.

When Lively Tweeted that she is “honoured” to be part of the movement, Farrow responded: “You worked with my abuser – am I a woman that matters too?”

Blake Lively, who worked with Allen on his film Cafe Society, has not yet responded.

A number of other actors and actresses have expressed regret at working with Allen, most recently David Krumholz, who starred in Wonder WheelHe said of his involvement in the film:

I deeply regret working with Woody Allen on Wonder Wheel. It’s one of my most heartbreaking mistakes. We can no longer let these men represent us in entertainment, politics, or any other realm. They are beneath real men.”

 

Source: News Corp
Image: Getty Images / Neilson Barnard