CONTENT WARNING: This article discusses rape and sexual assault.

Four men have accused Bohemian Rhapsody director Bryan Singer of sexually abusing them as teens, telling The Atlantic he would often invite underage boys to parties under the pretence of helping their careers before coercing or forcing them into sex acts.

Speaking publicly about their alleged abuse for the first time, their accounts mark the latest in a long string of serious allegations and lawsuits levelled against the blockbuster director.

In the piece, a man identified as Eric claims to have had sex with Singer in 1997 after he had told the director he was 17, and claimed to have been part of a party scene in which heavy-hitting Hollywood figures targeted underage boys for sex.

Another man linked to the same circle, named in the piece as Andy, claims to have had sex with the director when he was 15. Andy alleges the incident and his involvement with Singer may have precipitated his drug addiction.

“I sort of wonder if I’d never met [convicted sex offender Marc Collins-Rector] and then Bryan, if I would have ever got into the drugs,” he told The Atlantic.

Further allegations of rape and molestation from two other men feature in the article.

Singer has responded to the piece, denying its claims outright and asserting one of the reporters behind it is “homophobic” with “a bizarre obsession with me dating back to 1997.”

“Again, I am forced to reiterate that this story rehashes claims from bogus lawsuits filed by a disreputable cast of individuals willing to lie for money or attention,” Singer said in a statement to Deadline.

“And it is no surprise that, with Bohemian Rhapsody being an award-winning hit, this homophobic smear piece has been conveniently timed to take advantage of its success.”

Singer is credited as the director of Bohemian Rhapsody despite being fired from production three weeks before filming finished. Although Bohemian Rhapsody collected several accolades at the Golden Globes, Singer’s name was conspicuously absent from acceptance speeches.

You can read the exposé here. 


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Source: The Atlantic
Image: Jason LaVeris / Getty Images