In absolutely HUGE news, the Biloela family, who were recently moved to a Perth detention centre, have just been granted three-month bridging visas.

The Biloela family have spent the last couple of years detained on Christmas Island, and were only recently brought back into Australia after their youngest daughter required emergency medical care and was transported to a Perth hospital.

The bridging visas were granted to three of the Murugappan family members – Priya, Nades and Kopika. This means the parents can work and Kopika can attend school in Perth while youngest daughter Tharnicaa receives medical care.

Immigration minister Alex Hawke agreed to an application under a section of the Migration Act that allows him to grant visas in the public interest.

“This decision allows three members of the family to reside in the Perth community on bridging visas while the youngest child’s medical care, and the family’s legal matters, are ongoing. The fourth family member’s visa status is unchanged,” Mr Hawke said in a statement.

“The family will continue to have access to health care, support services, housing and schooling in the Perth community.”

Tharnicaa, who just turned four years old, was flown to a Perth hospital after being gravely ill with a suspected blood infection. Now, two weeks later, she’s been released from her hospital stay after receiving treatment for a blood infection caused by untreated pneumonia. She is expected to receive medical treatment for several weeks.

Tharnicaa is the only member of the family not granted a visa, prompting questions on what this means for the fate of her family and their community.

“Today’s news is another huge step int he long journey home for Priya and her family, but there still there is no certain pathway home to Milo,” Angela Fredericks, family friend of the Biloela family and spokesperson for the #HomeToBilo organisation, said in a statement.

“While we welcome Priya, Nades, and Kopika being granted bridging visas, we wonder what precisely is the Minister’s objective in denying little Tharni one. This family must stay together, and they need to be back in Biloela as soon as humanly possible.

“We know just how many Australians hold this family int heir hearts, and have helped get them to this moment today. Now, we need Mr Morrison and Mr Hawke to finally acknowledge that widespread support and end this long, painful saga.”

Priya and her husband Nades came to Australia as Tamil refugees escaping persecution. They met and married in Australia, and were active participants in their regional community of Biloela, where their two daughters were born.

Until the Biloela family are reunited with their community (and NOT on a temporary basis), their fate remains uncertain. Until they are free to remain in Australia with no time limits or, celebrations will be short-lived.