It’s that time of year again where everyone on your feed starts to share their streaming habits with their Spotify Wrapped posts, meaning we’ve got another year of data crunched from the streaming giants. And apparently, Tones and I has made a bloody motza off everyone streaming her tracks, specifically Dance Monkey.

Earlier this year, Dance Monkey hit over 1 billion streams on Spotify, and at the time of writing has just about cracked the 2 billion mark (it’s currently sitting on 1,964,868,292). And that’s only on one streaming platform.

With that number of streams online since the track was dropped back in May 2019, The Daily Mail reports that she’s now earned over $12 million off that one song alone.

I took the liberty of punching in Tones’ streaming numbers into TuneMunk – a calculator that converts stream numbers into a rough estimation of how much royalties are expected. Chucking in the Spotify stream number for Dance Monkey, it gave me a value of $7,859,473.168. Assuming that’s spat out in United States dollars, I popped that number through a currency converter, which gave me $10,618,753.43.

Not quite the $12million from Spotify that the Daily Mail came up with here, but god damn it’s still a shitload of money. May I stress that this is just one song on one streaming platform? The full total is absolutely much higher once you consider Apple Music, Deezer, YouTube, and everywhere else Tones and I has her tracks.

The number boffins over at Spotify have declared that Dance Monkey has kept its spot in the most-streamed Aussie songs of the year – as well as Tones and I picking up the silver for Never Seen The Rain. She also copped the #2 most-streamed track globally with Dance Monkey.

A pretty solid effort from this year, if you ask me.

It’s entirely unsurprising that Tones and I is very much in the Forbes 30 Under 30 for Entertainment and Sports in Asia-Pacific this year, what with that delicious pay packet some two years after literally busking on the streets of Byron Bay. Now it’s a matter of time before we find out if she’s kept her spot on the 2021 list for the Asia-Pacific region.

Image: Getty Images / Gus Stewart