Start looking at flights, because London is about to become home to a huge Yayoi Kusama mind-bending Infinity Room, heaps bigger than any that we’ve seen before.

The Japanese modern artist’s immersive installations have previously cropped up at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Sydney, the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art and most recently at Melbourne‘s National Gallery of Victoria – you know, that flower one at the Triennial that everyone has on their Instagram.

Now she’s popping up a massive Infinity Room at the Victoria Miro, which is easily going to be a top priority for modern art appreciators and those who just wanna stand in a darkened room full of mirrors and tiny fairy lights and bliss out for a while.

Yayoi Kusama, Infinity Room. 1999.

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The exhibition will also feature pieces from her My Eternal Soul series, including a run of newer paintings and pieces, as well as bronze sculptures of pumpkins and flowers, and her coveted Infinity Room – this time an entirely mirrored room filled with paper lanterns dangling from the ceiling, splashed with her iconic polka dots.

Kusama, teetering on the edge of her 90s birthday, explores her inner feelings and fears through her work like a giant visual diary, both retrospective and introspective. Her work is surreal, expansive and detailed, combing through almost nine decades of what she calls ‘obliterations’ – hallucinations where Kusama sees repetitive, overwhelming patterns seeping into the reality that surrounds her.

Yayoi Kusama has previously expressed that her obsession with polka dots leans a lot into her mental health, believing that the pervasiveness of weaving polka dots throughout her highly sought-after work is a powerful theme of her own life, and credits the obsession with saving her life through polka dots acting as a method to work through previous trauma.

The huge exhibition is at Victoria Miro from October 3rd to December 21st, open from 10am to 6pm Tuesdays to Saturdays.

Image: Getty Images / Bernard Weil