After creating an Instagram campaign to stop users obsessing and tracking their weight and body measurements on the app, actress Jameela Jamil has taken a further step by asking Instagram to ban posts which list measurements of famous women.

In an Instagram post, the The Good Place actress shared a screenshot from account @Myskygomez, a Selena Gomez fan account, which listed Ariana Grande, Gomez and Taylor Swift’s presumed heights and weights.

“What are we doing to our girls?,” she wrote. “Social media is great but so dangerous when ignorant MORONS give misinformation to women… Why do we want girls to agonise over this? Why is this what we write about three of the most successful powerhouse business women of our generation?”

Oh my FUCKING DAYS. WHAT THE FUCK IS THIS?! What are we doing to our girls? Social media is great but so dangerous when ignorant MORONS give misinformation to women. Why are people so obsessed with weight? also why do they never explain to girls that heavy bones and muscle density differs from person to person? why do we want girls to agonize over this? Why is this what we write about three of the most successful powerhouse business women of our generation? This shit is EXACTLY why I started the @i_weigh account and I’m so sorry for all the girls who are currently sitting in their bedrooms, missing their lives, thinking that they need to match a certain weight to be worth something in our society. @instagram should ban these posts.

A post shared by Jameela Jamil (@jameelajamilofficial) on

Jamil explains that these posts are “exactly why” she created the @i_weigh account in March, which shares posts of people “weighing” themselves by their accomplishments and appreciations. Chuck it a follow, it’s quite moving.

A post shared by I Weigh (@i_weigh) on

As a photo sharing app, Instagram’s potential affect on self-esteem and issues of mental health is well-documented. Many studies suggest that the carefully-curated element of the app creates an unrealistic glamour to other’s lives.

Additionally, many “pro-ana ‘and other pro-body dysmorphia communities have formed on Instagram. Currently, Insta’s #1 demographic is teenage girls from 13-18.

Jamil recently penned an op-ed for Glamour on the issue, where she summed it up pretty simply:

I don’t even want to talk about body positivity anymore because it means we are still focusing on our looks. I want to take back the control of what women are valued as and move entirely away from the conversation. I want to hear about and see what women are doing. Are we traveling? Are we loving? Are we studying? Are we succeeding? Are we running around after children? Are we growing emotionally?

If you see these sorts of posts, do the world some good and report them.

Image: The Good Place