Eggs for breakfast is the absolute tits.

Whether boiled, poached, fried or scrambled, they always satisfy.

And according to new research from the CSIRO, chowing down on fluffy scrambies every day could be conducive to weight loss. The research suggests it provides a protein fix that helps you stay fuller for longer.

Protein Balance: New concepts for protein in weight management reveals that ‘Strayans should increase their protein intake in the mornings to at least 25g.

“The average Australian eats much lower amounts of protein at breakfast, so increasing breakfast protein may help to control eating later in the day,” said senior principal research scientist for CSIRO and co-author of the CSIRO Total Wellbeing Diet, Professor Manny Noakes.

“If you find it difficult to control what you eat, a redistribution of protein towards breakfast may be the answer to reducing your waistline without leaving you ravenously hungry and craving unhealthy foods,” she said.

CSIRO points out the fact that for many of us, protein intake is skewed towards dinner, with only tiny amounts being consumed at breakfast. It should really be the other way around.

The research goes on to show average women consume 11g of protein at breakfast, and males just 15g. Those averages rise to 24g and 44g at dinner, and more than one third of those amounts comes from low-quality sources like processed foods, instead of whole protein sources including lean meats, fish, eggs, legumes and dairy.

The CSIRO Total Wellbeing Diet’s Protein Balance program recommends redistributing your protes intake to 25g at breakfast, 25g at lunch, 40g at dinner and 10g for snacks.

Eggs (without the white bread and tomato sauce, sorry) are a high-protein, low-carb food source that fits well with these recommendations, and the fact that it’s freaking delicious is merely a plus.

The research circles back to the dietary advice we’ve heard time and time again, and that’s that eating breakfast = good.

Source: CSIRO
Image: Getty Images / Amy Brothers