With video game nostalgia in full swing thanks to products like the Mini NES and SNES systems, it was only a matter of time before a tiny Game Boy hit the spotlight.

But unlike the miniature consoles, the PocketSprite isn’t a Nintendo product, rather, it’s a crowdfunded project for a keychain Game Boy that emerged over a year ago. Originally a DYI product, the tiny handheld gaming device has hit crowdfunding website, Crowd Supply, to flog the units on a commercial level.

The unit’s original creator, Jeroen Domburg, has teamed up with manufacturer Steve K. for the venture, seeking a goal of $US20,000 ($25,711 AUD). At the time of writing, they’ve managed to raise $US12,093 ($15,546 AUD).

On the inside, the cute little unit is packing an OLED screen, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, a rechargeable battery, and a built-in speaker. On the slightly nerdier side of things, it runs on a dual-core, 240 MHz ESP32 processor, and 520 KB of RAM. To put that into perspective, the OG Game Boy ran on a 4.19 MHz processor and 16 KB of memory.

In terms of what it can play, the PocketSprite comes with built-in emulators that can run Game Boy, Game Boy Colour, Game Gear, and Sega Master System games. To add ROMs (games) to the device, it creates its own Wi-Fi network which you can connect to transfer them from a computer.

It’s open source, as well, so if you’re handy enough with coding, you can add any games or emulators you want, assuming they can run on the PocketSprite’s processing power.

You can cop two different versions of the device via its Crowd Supply site – a fully-assembled unit, or a DIY kit you put together yourself. If you get in on an early bird deal, the company is planning to ship those orders on April 15.

Prices start at $US45 ($57.85 AUD) if you’re keen to grab one, which will ship worldwide at no extra cost. You can suss it all out right here.

Source: The Verge
Image: PocketSprite