Harry Potter‘s birthplace in Godric’s Hollow – as it appears in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – is on the market for a cool £995,000 i.e. $1.63 million.

The six-bedroom De Vere House in Lavenham, a medieval village in Suffolk about two hour hours northeast of London, is Grade I listed. That means it’s been deemed of special architectural or historic interest and added to the National Heritage List in England. Probably because “the boy who lived” was born there.

In real terms that means a buyer can’t just knock it down or refurbish the kitchen on a whim – but I mean, the thing, littered with period features, already has: a reception hall, three reception rooms, four bathrooms, and a sunny open-air terrace. Oh and a massive 1618mgarden.

Plus, just think about the cultural significance of living in the place where HP’s parents were murdered/he got his scar/Voldemort was temporarily defeated. That’s just the short version of the story of Godric’s Hollow, where a heap of renowned wizards apparently lived.

For history fans it was home to the de Vere family through the 14th to the 17th centuries, and they had their fair share of stories, including visits from royalty, as well as this tasty morsel: the poet Edward de Vere is considered by some to scholars to be the real Shakespeare. Boom, lit scandal.

Apparently the doorway to De Vere House is the second-most-photographed in the UK, after 10 Downing Street, which makes total sense, considering Potterheads and history buffs alike are bloody fiends.

Last year, the Dursley family home on Privet Drive was put on the market for about $822,000 – still significantly less than the median house price in Sydney.

Source: The Mirror
Image: Right Move