Danielle Bernstein, a US fashion influencer and owner of popular brand We Wore What, has addressed allegations that she allegedly ripped off one of her designs from Aussie Etsy store, Art Garments.

As pointed out by Diet Prada, Bernstein claimed she was producing a pair of marigold shorts based on “vintage gym shorts from the ’90s.”

“Woke up to so many DMs about these shorts… they’re vintage gym shorts from the 90s and I’m already remaking them for my brand,” she captioned a pic of her wearing the shorts.

It was soon pointed out that they look a helluva lot like shorts being sold on Art Garments Wand according to their receipts, as retrieved by Diet Prada, Danielle bought two pairs from them back in November 11 2019.

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On July 15, Danielle Bernstein aka @weworewhat posted a picture wearing a pair of simple marigold shorts. “Woke up to so many DMs about these shorts… they’re vintage gym shorts from the 90s and I’m already remaking them for my brand!,” the influencer said, adding that she always finds inspiration in the vintage pieces she collects. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ But Australian Etsy shop @artgarmentsau 's receipts tell a different story. Since 2011, Grace Corby has been collecting vintage and selling curated finds online. “I hand source, shoot, edit and upload, measure & describe, hand wrap & post each piece myself…. it's a labour of love and never really feels like work,” she said. Corby's only non-vintage item is a pair of simple elastic-waist shorts, which are clearly listed as “pre-order." After an uptick in sales when her shop was tagged in the comments of WeWoreWhat’s post, she searched her past orders, finding Bernstein had purchased two pairs on Nov. 11, 2019. ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ As with the chain masks, the issue is not the “originality” of the item, but the apparent conscious choice to exploit smaller businesses. “We all know fashion often references vintage, so I'm not sure why my pairs were chosen as a template and not a true 90s gym short,” Corby said. Her own shorts are based off a €3 Berlin flea market find, worn until the waist lost its stretch. “I took what remained to a local seamstress with some amendments (longer, wider legs for a bit more coverage, stretchier waist).” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Many designers reference vintage, and always have. The best transform it by adding their own flavor, even to basic items. “There are ethical ways to use vintage in the inspiration and design process. Tweaking and personalising. Ensuring you're not siphoning credit and revenue from a small Aussie shop.” ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Bernstein has since updated her caption: “these are from Etsy and I totally thought they were vintage but they are made to order – someone on my team ordered them for me a while back. I will not be making them.” Odd, considering it still says she collects her own vintage pieces. Some free advice for Danielle—save yourself the scandal and just visit a thrift shop or flea market yourself.

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Grace Corby, the owner of Art Garments, called out Bernstein for ripping off her threads.

“We all know fashion often references vintage, so I’m not sure why my pairs were chosen as a template and not a true 90s gym short,” Corby said, whose own shorts are based off a Berlin flea market find.

“I took what remained to a local seamstress with some amendments (longer, wider legs for a bit more coverage, stretchier waist).”

She added, “There are ethical ways to use vintage in the inspiration and design process. Tweaking and personalising. Ensuring you’re not siphoning credit and revenue from a small Aussie shop.”

Following the backlash, Bernstein updated her caption on We Wore What to say: “These are from Etsy and I totally thought they were vintage but they are made to order – someone on my team ordered them for me a while back.”

She added, “I will not be making them.”