Late yesterday, the internet lit up after adult film star and writer Stoya accused ex-boyfriend and fellow adult film star James Deen of rape.

The pair broke up last year, and Stoya made the accusations in a pair of Tweets, saying that the 29-year-old Deen – real name Bryan Sevilla – held her down and had sex with her against her will.

Porn Star James Deen’s Advice Column Axed After Rape Claims By Ex-GF Stoya

Deen has yet to respond to the serious accusations, however, the fallout has begun, with sex and dating website The Frisky cancelling the actor’s advice column WWJDD.

The column, which has run since May of this year, has tackled issues like ‘I Want To Do Porn But I’m Afraid My Family Will Shun Me’ and ‘How Do I Get My Boyfriend To Dominate Me In Bed?’

In an editorial published earlier today, Amelia McDonell-Parry explained her decision to end ties between the website and Deen, saying:

I very much liked James Deen. I enjoyed working with him on WWJDD. I asked him to do an advice column because I liked his directness and his confidence, but most of all, I liked his emphasis on communication, honesty and, most of all, CONSENT. That he has been accused of violating Stoya’s consent, that women I respect have since contacted me directly to say that they know of others to whom he has done the same thing? Well, I’m fucking heartsick over it. This makes it impossible for me to work with him any further, to give him a forum for giving advice that he is accused of not following himself. No amount of good rapport between us or traffic to his columns would EVER supersede the fact that I BELIEVE WOMEN.

Acknowledging the delicate nature of the case, McDonell-Parry stood firmly by her decision, saying

“The court of public opinion is not a court of law, and I don’t need Stoya or any woman to “prove” that she has been raped for me to believe her. Women who come out as rape victims are far, far, far too often not believed. This is especially true of women who work in the sex industry, with people actually wondering aloud if porn stars can be raped. Victims are put on trial themselves, with everything they’ve ever said/done/worn suddenly under scrutiny as possible “evidence” that they are lying or that they asked for it. This occurs despite mountains of actual evidence indicating that false rape accusations are exceedingly rare.”

McDonell-Parry said that she had messaged Deen about the accusations but not received a response. You can read her editorial in full here.

If you have experienced sexual assault, call 1800 RESPECT on 1800 737 732. 

Photo: Albert L Ortega via Getty Images