Do you like Mad Men but wish it had way more cocaine, Quaaludes, spicy language and dudes whipping their dicks out at pool parties? You might just be in luck, because The Wolf Of Wall Street himself, Jordan Belfort, is in talks to create a “Mad Men-style television series about the excesses of the New York finance industry in the ’80s.” What’s even better is that street fighting man James Packer is helping him do it.  

Packer will produce the show with RatPac, the entertainment company he runs with Rush Hour director Brett Ratner. Jordan Belfort pitched the idea of a TV series to Ratner and then Packer, who is reportedly obsessed with Martin Scorsese‘s Wolf Of Wall Street, and watches it repeatedly. The image of Packer sitting in his undies in the flickering darkness watching the country club scene over and over has pretty much made my weekend. 

Belfort will co-write the series, and told The Weekend Australian that it will be about the dawn of the first bull market in the ’80s, the “greed is good” decade of such films as Oliver Stone‘s Wall Street.  “Before that, Wall Street didn’t resemble the way it is today,” he said. “You can trace back everything about the way Wall Street is today to when the first bull market started in 1982 when Reagan cut interest rates.”

Yeah yeah, blah blah blah, as long as the show has a cool ’80s soundtrack, some sharp suits and a bunch of amoral guys and girls pulling in big bucks and snorting things from places you probably shouldn’t snort things, we’re on board. I dunno what Jon Hamm‘s doing after Mad Men, but he could jump right into the role of a smooth-talking Patrick Bateman-style millionaire serial killer, right?

The name of Packer’s company, RatPac, is a reference to the old Hollywood crew that Frank Sinatra used to run with. To further hammer the point home, it operates out of Sinatra’s old office on the Warner Bros. lot. RatPac will produce Belfort’s show as part of a $450 million deal hammered out last year. in which they will co-finance all of Warner Bros. future movies, while also investing in film and TV projects of their own.

via The Australian
Picture: Michael Loccisano via Getty Images