Yahoo has very casually revealed that it was subject to what may be the biggest hack of all time, confirming that a "state-sponsored actor" stole the credentials for at least 500 million accounts back in 2014. At least.

The stolen info contained names, email addresses, telephone numbers, birthdays, hashed passwords, but it is not believed to have included any credit card data.

It's awkward for the once-mighty company, who are currently being acquired by telco giant Verizon, who issued a statement on the kerfuffle. 


500 million is a lot. Here is Yahoo's statement:

A recent investigation by Yahoo! Inc. has confirmed that a copy of certain user account information was stolen from the company’s network in late 2014 by what it believes is a state-sponsored actor. The account information may have included names, email addresses, telephone numbers, dates of birth, hashed passwords (the vast majority with bcrypt) and, in some cases, encrypted or unencrypted security questions and answers. The ongoing investigation suggests that stolen information did not include unprotected passwords, payment card data, or bank account information; payment card data and bank account information are not stored in the system that the investigation has found to be affected. Based on the ongoing investigation, Yahoo believes that information associated with at least 500 million user accounts was stolen and the investigation has found no evidence that the state-sponsored actor is currently in Yahoo’s network. Yahoo is working closely with law enforcement on this matter.

Yahoo is notifying potentially affected users and has taken steps to secure their accounts. These steps include invalidating unencrypted security questions and answers so that they cannot be used to access an account and asking potentially affected users to change their passwords. Yahoo is also recommending that users who haven’t changed their passwords since 2014 do so.

So there – if you haven't changed your Yahoo password in a few years, and you still use Yahoo for some reason, you better get to changing that password quick.

Source: Business Insider.
Photo: IT Crowd.