Around about this time last year, Charlotte Gainsbourg was in the midst of promoting Antichrist, a nihilistic and wildly divisive Lars Von Trier thriller that shocked most of Cannes with a now-infamous castration scene. Now, twelve months later, Gainsbourg is back in the French Riviera to promote Julie Bertucelli's The Tree, a film adaptation of "Our Father Who Art in a Tree" the 2003 novel by Australian author Judy Pascoe.

Thankfully there's no genital mutilation in Gainsbourg's latest outing but loss still plays a major factor (a son in Antichrist, a husband in The Tree) as does, as the title might suggest, the omnipotence of nature - represented in the latter by a hulking Moreton Bay fig tree - a symbol of nature that's infinitely more pleasant than this corpse-filled sex plant.

The film closed Cannes on Sunday to mostly-positive reviews and seeing as it's a co-production between Australia and France that was filmed in Queensland with Australian actors, I'm sure you'll be hearing more about it soon. The film's website offers the following synopsis: After the sudden death of her father, 8-year-old Simone shares a secret with her mother Dawn. She's convinced her father speaks to her through the leaves of her favourite tree and he's come back to protect them. Check out the trailer below...